Offshore Oil and the Energy Debate

Emilio Cogliani

We are locked in a political debate over energy. On one side are those who wish to extract as much oil, gas, and minerals from the earth as fast as possible and convert it to profit; on the other, those who wish to sustain such resources, develop and transition to less polluting alternatives, and invent more efficient processes and products that will enable equal, more equitable growth worldwide. Everywhere you look, there is a battle engaged over our energy future–near and long term–with interests vested in the status quo up against interests vested in change and a sustainable future.

The debate pits those benefiting most from the present systems and its profits against those who assess the ecological and political damage from such reliance and the future implications of resultant climate change, diminished resources, and capacity to meet the predictable demands of the growing world population. It is a battle…

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The Next Big Thing You Missed: LinkedIn’s Quest to Get a Job for Everyone on Earth

Emilio Cogliani

The Next Big Thing You Missed: LinkedIn?s Quest to Get a Job for Everyone on Earth

According to LinkedIn CEO Jeff Weiner, the world has about 600 million “knowledge workers”—the professional class that spends much of its workday in front of a computer. Of these, he says, more than half have a profile on LinkedIn. Yes, he wants to get the other half to join his company’s business-centric social network. But that’s only the start of his ambition, Weiner told an audience of CEOs and entrepreneurs this week at Techonomy, a technology and business conference held this year in Half Moon Bay, California. More than just professionals, Weiner says, he wants to get everyone on LinkedIn—and, in the process, find everyone a job.

The post The Next Big Thing You Missed: LinkedIn?s Quest to Get a Job for Everyone on Earth appeared first on WIRED.



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Mapping spread of diarrhea bacteria a major step toward new vaccine

Emilio Cogliani

Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) bacteria are responsible each year for around 400 million cases of diarrhea and 400,000 deaths in the world’s low- and middle-income countries. Children under the age of five are most affected. ETEC bacteria also cause diarrhea in nearly one in two travelers to these areas. In a major breakthrough, researchers used comprehensive DNA analyses to reveal the ETEC bacteria’s genetic composition – an analysis that also makes it possible to map how the bacteria spread.

from Top Environment News — ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1oGVgi7

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The brain’s ‘inner GPS’ gets dismantled

Emilio Cogliani

Imagine being able to recognize your car as your own but never being able to remember where you parked it. Researchers have induced this all-too-common human experience — or a close version of it — permanently in rats and from what is observed perhaps derive clues about why strokes and Alzheimer’s disease can destroy a person’s sense of direction.

from Top Environment News — ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1oGVcPA

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Thousands of never-before-seen human genome variations uncovered

Emilio Cogliani

Thousands of never-before-seen genetic variants in the human genome have been uncovered using a new genome sequencing technology. These discoveries close many human genome mapping gaps that have long resisted sequencing. The technique, called single-molecule, real-time DNA sequencing, may now make it possible for researchers to identify potential genetic mutations behind many conditions whose genetic causes have long eluded scientists.

from Top Environment News — ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1tCZGCo

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Kīlauea, 1790 and today

Emilio Cogliani

Scores of people were killed by an explosive eruption of Kilauea Volcano, Hawai‘i, in 1790. Research suggests that most of the fatalities were caused by hot, rapidly moving surges of volcanic debris and steam that engulfed the victims. Deposits of such surges occur on the surface on the west summit area and cover an ash bed indented with human footprints.

from Top Environment News — ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1tCZCCL

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New listing to protect 21 species of sharks and rays

Emilio Cogliani

Conservationists are rejoicing at the listing of 21 species of sharks and rays under the Appendices of the Convention on Migratory Species, made official today in the final plenary session of the Conference of Parties (CoP).

from Top Environment News — ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1tCZByp

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